Four days Trip in Georgia

4 days Trip in Georgia

  • 4 Days
  • From : Tbilisi
  • To : Kakheti
  • Tour
  • Guide : English
  • Minimum age : 4 Years Old

* This product requests separate payment. Promotion code or coupon from Ticket Here is not applicable.

Exploring Cities such as: Tbilisi, Mtskheta, Gori, Kazbegi, kakheti
Wine-tasting
Explore multiple attractions in just four days
Learn about Georgia’s long history of wine making

What’s included?

  • Fuel surcharge
  • Departure tax
  • Bus fare

Air-conditioned vehicle
Private transportation
Fuel surcharge
Airport pick up
3-stars hotel

Exclusions

  • Entry or admission fee
  • National park entrance fee
  • Food & drinks

Please note

  • Stroller / pram accessible
  • Animals or pets allowed
  • Public transportation nearby
  • Passport required
  • Dress code

Not wheelchair accessible

Infants must not sit on laps

  • Infant seats unavailable
  • Not recommended for pregnant travelers
  • look for the ticket booth with the red line
  • we pick up from Shota Rustaveli Tbilisi International Airport, Tbilisi, Georgia. After that we transfer to the hotel.
  •  in the church dress code is essential

Cancellation policy

Once ordered, this tour cannot be cancelled or refund or amended at any circumstances.

Note: Pick-up starts 30 minute(s) before departure.

We offer pick-up to the following places for this experience:

  • Shota Rustaveli Tbilisi International Airport

 

Day 1 :  

day first: Tbilisi tour

Day 1 :  

Built in year 2004, the Holy Trinity Tsminda Sameba Cathedral is also called the symbol of new Georgia. The beauty and sizes of cathedral are indeed breathtaking, and rises magnificently on the hill of the St. Ilya, on the left bank of the Kura River. Sameba is the highest church in Georgia. It is 101m high. For comparison, before Sameba, the Alaverdi Cathedral in Kakheti was considered the tallest, with about 50m in height. Sameba Cathedral was built with grandiose scope. Its golden dome is practically seen from any point in Tbilisi. The cathedral is part of the entire complex including residence of the Patriarch and a monastery, school of theology and academy, hotel and the complex consisting of nine chapels, five of which are located under the ground. Construction of Sameba Cathedral was timed to the 2000th anniversary of Christianity and 1500th anniversary of the independence of the Georgian church. The construction of the cathedral was decided in 1989 but it started only on 23 November 1995. The first divine service in cathedral was held on 25 December 2002 during the construction works that finally ended in 2004. Construction was sponsored by wealthy residents of the city. The square of the Sameba Cathedral equals 5000 square meters, and can place up to 15,000 people. The foundation of the cathedral was done according to all traditions: pieces from holy spots were placed in its basement like rocks from the Sion Mountain and the Jordan River, soil from Jerusalem and from the tomb of St. George. The Patriarch and the President have laid the memorial nameplates too. Bells for the cathedral were cast in Germany. There are nine of them, and the biggest weighs 8,000 kg. The cathedral is designed in the spirit of modernism, and its architecture has little similarities with old traditions. Faces of the cathedral are done exquisitely with arches and unique fretwork. There are beautiful frescoes created under the supervision of the icon painter Amiran Goglidze on the walls of the Sameba Cathedral. Catholicos Patriarch of Georgia Ilia II also took part in painting works of the Tsminda Sameba Cathedral; he painted several icons and a big image of the Holy Virgin that can be seen at the entrance. There are two floors under the ground; on the second floor there are museum and conference hall. Holy Trinity Cathedral is considered one of the main sights of Tbilisi.

Day 1 :  

Virgin Mary Metekhi church is located on the left bank of the river Mtkvari, on the cliff plateau , the first church on this place was probably built by Vakhtang Gorgasali symbolically resembling the church built on virgin Mary’s tomb in Gethsemane garden in Jerusalem.

Day 1 :  

Shardeni Street is one of the most popular and beautiful streets in Tbilisi. This pedestrian street is so well known that any guest that travels to Georgia never leaves this country without visiting Shardeni Street.

Day 1 :  

Sioni or Zion Cathedral in the name of the Assumption of the Mother of God is one of the most known monuments in the Old Town . The beginning of its construction is dated the 5 th – 6 th centuries and the completion – the first half of the 7 th century. The Cathedral is named in the honor of Jerusalem Zion. Today Sioni is the residence of the Catholicos – the Patriarch of Georgian Christian church. There the greatest relic of Georgia , the cross of St. Nino who established Christianity on Georgian soil, is kept there. The cross is made of two grapevines and is intertwined with the Saint’s hair according to the legend. Sioni was repeatedly destroyed by enemies. But each time it rose from the ashes. Sioni Cathedral, TbilisiDespite the high status of the temple, its look is modest and reserved. Its architectural style reminds strict Catholic structures of a religious cult lacking any elements of decor. The only ornament of the cathedral is the high tower with the peaked steepled dome towering over the central part of Sioni. The dome rests on the vaults closing the altar walls and two separately standing arrow shaped columns.

Day 1 :  

The “Abanotubani” is the name given to the district in the Old Town of Tbilisi where there is a whole street (Abanos kucha) of public bathhouses that use the sulphurous waters of the many hot springs in this area.

Day 1 :  

Also called the Mother Fortress of Tbilisi, Narikala is an ancient symbol of Tbilisi’s defence. The fortress was established in the 4th century, around the period when the city itself was founded. It was then known as Shuris-tsikhe (Invidious Fort). The name Narikala is said to derive from a Persian word for citadel, but another theory says was the name that Mongols used, meaning “little fortress”. It was expanded considerably by the Arabs during the 7th and 8th centuries. The Arabs built the Emir’s palace within its walls. King David further extended the Builder the fortress in th 11th century. Most of the existing fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827 it was damaged by an earthquake and was not resorted. St. Nikolos church, inside the fortress walls, dates from the 12th century. It was renovated in 1996. Narikala offers you some of the best panoramas of the city. We’d also advise you to take a walk along the Narikala Tourist route, a 1500 metre trail that runs from the top of the ridge near the Mother Georgia statue, around the fortress and down into Old Town to near the entrance to the Botanical Gardens. It offers stunning views at every turn and is a particular delight at night when the city lights shine below.

Day 1 :  

Rike park is considered to be the youngest recreational area in Tbilisi. It is situated on the left bank of the river Kura (Mtkvari) and already has become a popular place for both local and international visitors, especially families, and in summer. The Rike park is quite easy to find, as its main entrance is right from the beautiful pedestrian ‘Bridge of Peace’. The park is a host to a numerous entertainment facilities like singing and dancing fountains, artificial climbing wall, children’s maze, mega-chess board, as well as footpaths and quiet corners. The start point of a newly opened cable car that takes visitors up to Narikala fortress is located in the Rike park, as well as a number of fancy bars and restaurants.

Day 1 :  

Relatively newly constructed the Bridge of Peace is definitely the attraction one wouldn’t want to miss in Tbilisi. It is a pedestrian glass and steel bridge in a bow-shaped design that sits over the Mtkvari (Kura) river in Georgian capital. It was officially opened in May 2010. The bridge was brought to Georgia from Italy in 200 unassembled components. The bridge is 156 meters long and has more than 10 000 LED bulbs built-in, that are switched on daily 90 minutes before the sunset.

Day 1 :  

in the 3-stars hotel

Day 2 :  

day second: tour in Uflistsikhe (Gori) and Mtskheta

Day 2 :  

Jvari monastery is overlooking city of Mtskheta from the mountain. Soon after accepting Christianity in Georgia, construction of Jvari Monastery started, which was in 4th century, during 30s years. The main big church was built in 11th century. From Jvari Monastery you will be able to enjoy magical panorama; Wave-like mountains, panorama of city of Mtskheta and a place where two rivers unite (Aragvi and Kura (Mtkvari))

Day 2 :  

Mtskheta One of the oldest cities of Georgia founded by the ancient Meschian tribes in the 5th century . Due to its historical significance and several cultural monuments, is recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. It was capital of the early Georgian Kingdom of Iberia from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD. However, Mtskheta continued to serve as the coronation and burial place for most kings of Georgia until the end of the kingdom in the 19th century. The Svetitskhoveli Cathedral (literally the Cathedral of the Living Pillar) It is currently the second largest church building in Georgia, after the Holy Trinity Cathedral. Known as the burial site of Christ’s mantle, Svetitskhoveli has long been one of the principal Georgian Orthodox churches and is among the most venerated places of worship in the region.Svetitskhoveli was not only the site of the coronation of the Georgian kings but also served as their burial place.

Day 2 :  

The museum makes no serious attempt to present a balanced account of Stalin’s career or deeds. It remains, much as when it opened in 1957, a reverent homage to the Gori boy who became a key figure of 20th-century world history – although guides do now at least refer to the purges, the Gulag and his 1939 pact with Hitler. As well as the halls of memorabilia, the visit includes the tiny wood-and-mudbrick house where Stalin lived for the first four years of his life. The house, where Stalin’s parents rented a single room, stands in front of the main museum building, under its own temple-like superstructure. The museum charts Stalin’s journey from the Gori church school to leadership of the USSR, the Yalta Conference at the end of WWII and his death in 1953. The first hall upstairs covers his childhood and adolescence, including his rather cringeworthy pastoral poetry, and then his early revolutionary activities in Georgia, his seven jail terms under the tsarist authorities (six of them in Siberia), the revolution of 1917 and Lenin’s death in 1924. The text of Lenin’s 1922 political testament that described Stalin as too coarse and power-hungry, advising Communist Party members to remove him from post of General Secretary, is on display. One room is devoted to a bronze copy of Stalin’s eerie death mask, lying in state. The next has a large collection of gifts from world leaders and other Bolsheviks. Off the staircase is a reconstruction of his first office in the Kremlin, plus personal memorabilia such as his pipes, glasses, cigars and slide rule. One small two-room section beside the foot of the stairs deals with political repression under Stalin. To one side of the museum is Stalin’s train carriage, in which he travelled to Yalta in 1945 (he didn’t like flying). Apparently bulletproof, its elegant interior includes a bathtub and a primitive air-conditioning system.

Day 2 :  

This fascinating and once enormous cave city sits 10km east of Gori above the north side of the Mtkvari River, with expansive views along the Mtkvari valley. Between the 6th century BC and 1st century AD, Uplistsikhe developed into one of the chief political and religious centres of pre-Christian Kartli, with temples dedicated principally to the sun goddess. After the Arabs occupied Tbilisi in AD 645, Uplistsikhe became the residence of the Christian kings of Kartli and an important trade centre on a main caravan road from Asia to Europe. At its peak it housed 20,000 people. Its importance declined after King David the Builder retook Tbilisi in 1122 and it was irrevocably destroyed by the Mongols in 1240. What you visit today is the 40,000-sq-metre Shida Qalaqi (Inner City), less than half of the original whole. Almost everything here has been uncovered by archaeologists since 1957.

Day 2 :  

in the 3-stars hotel

Day 3 :  

day third: tour in Gudauri and Kazbegi

Day 3 :  

Zhnivali water reservoir was built in 1985. The Zhinvali Hydroelectric Power Plant has two turbines with a nominal capacity of 65 MW each having a total capacity of 130 MW. WE WILL HAVE A LOOK AT ZHNIVALI WATER RESERVOIR FROM THE HIGHEST PEAK. BREATHTAKING VIEWS FROM THERE WILL OPEN UP IN FRONT OF YOUR EYES.

Day 3 :  

Ananuri castle represents multifunctional architectural complex of the late feudal times in Georgia. Built on the right bank of Aragvi River in 16th-17th cc, it was the main seat of Aragvi Eristavi – Dukes dynasty since 13th c . The village Ananuri is located on the main trade rout leading to the North, to Russia and in past it was part of the Great Silk Road. Nowadays the road is called the Georgian Military Highway. The distance from Tbilisi is 74 km (1 h) – beautiful driving along the Zhinvali water reservoir damping clean and blue mountain river of Aragvi. The castle, the bell tower, three churches and beautifully carved walls are the highlites why the site is frequently visited. The castle was the scene of numerous battles. In 1739, Ananuri was attacked by forces from a rival duchy, commanded by Shanshe of Ksani and was set on fire. The Aragvi clan was massacred. However, four years later, the local peasants revolted against rule by the Shamshe, killing the usurpers and inviting King Teimuraz II to rule directly over them. However, in 1746, King Teimuraz was forced to suppress another peasant uprising, with the help of King Erekle II of Kakheti. The fortress remained in use until the beginning of the 19th century. In 2007, the complex has been on the tentative list for inclusion into the UNESCO World Heritage Site program The fortifications consist of two castles joined by a crenellated curtain wall. The upper fortification with a large square tower, known as Sheupovari, is well preserved and is the location of the last defense of the Aragvi against the Shamshe. The lower fortification, with a round tower, is mostly in ruins. Within the complex, amongst other buildings, are two churches. The older Church of the Virgin, which abuts a tall square tower, has the graves of some of the Dukes of Aragvi. It dates from the first half of the 17th century, and was built of brick. The interior is no longer decorated, but of interest is a stone baldaquin erected by the widow of the Duke Edishera, who died in 1674. The larger Church of the Assumption (Ghvtismshobeli), built in 1689 for the son of Duke Bardzem. It is a central dome style structure with richly decorated facades, including a carved north entrance and a carved grapevine cross on the south façade. It also contains the remains of a number of frescoes, most of which were destroyed by the fire in the 18th century.

Day 3 :  

The Russia–Georgia Friendship Monument or Treaty of Georgievsk Monument is a monument build in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and ongoing friendship between Georgia and Soviet Russia. Located on the Georgian Military Highway between the ski resort town of Gudauri and the Jvari pass, the monument is a large round stone and concrete structure overlooking the Devil’s Valley in the Caucasus mountains. Inside the monument is a large tile mural that spans the whole circumference of the structure and depicts scenes of Georgian and Russian history.

Day 3 :  

The old Georgian Church is located under the Mount Kazbek, 2170m above the town of Stepantsminda (former Kazbegi) and village of Gergeti whose name she had adopted. The church is widely known as Gergeti trinity Church thought Georgians call it Gergeti Tsminda Sameba. It was built in the 14th century, but not much is known to us of its history, though it was mentioned in one of the guide books from 1906, that the church was built on the place that used to be pagan idols worshiping. And in 18th century, the church turned into storage for main Georgian relics that were transported here in the time of Persian invasion to Tbilisi. In the beginning of the 20th century, Soviet government had closed the church, and it was returned back to the Georgian Orthodox Church only in the 1990’s. But for the long times it had served as a popular waypoint for travelers on the road connecting Russia and Georgia. Gergeti Trinity Church is above Stepantsminda and thus it seems an impossible experience to climb up to it, but in fact ascent goes quite easy taking only an hour walk up the serpentine road and a thorny forest. Those who prefer not to walk can rent a car with a driver who will ride you up there in 10 minutes. Very often it happens that alpinists conquering the peak spend the night near the church to become acclimatized to new conditions. The architecture in the Gergeti Trinity Church is a traditional one for Georgia, although it is the only cupola church in the northern part of Georgia. A small bell tower is situated near the church, decorated with few bas-reliefs. The church itself is quite simple: only bas-reliefs and ordinary patterns decorate the massive stone blocs and the windows almost don’t let any light creating mysterious twilight. Unfortunately, it is not allowed to take photographs of the church interior.

Day 3 :  

in the 3-stars hotel

Day 4 :  

day fourth: tour in Kakheti

Day 4 :  

The St. George’s Monastery of St. Nino, sometimes also called the Bodbe Monastery, is one of the most important religious sites in Georgia. Today, there is a nunnery where the monastery used to be, and the St. George Cathedral, part of the monastery, holds the remains of St. Nino, Equal to the Apostles, who brought Christianity to Georgia. There is also a new cathedral being built, using much of the same construction methods used to make the most famous cathedrals in Georgia centuries ago.

Day 4 :  

The Georgian town of Sighnaghi is located in the eastern part of Kakheti, and is known as the City of Love. Sighnaghi was also one of Georgia’s many stops along the ancient Silk Road. Sighnaghi is just over an hour away from Tbilisi, which makes it a good escape from the busy life of the city. Many day trips and short excursions travel to Sighnaghi. The town has recently undergone significant restoration and infrastructural improvement, rendering Sighnaghi a must-see destination in Georgia. Casino gambling, high end hotels and dining, fine wines and a stunning view of the Alazani Valley make Sighnaghi one of Georgia’s most attractive small towns.

Day 4 :  

What’s special here is the 7.7km of wine tunnels, dug out of a hillside in the early 1960s for storing and ageing wine at constant temperatures. Today the tunnels store over 25,000 bottles of the Khareba company’s European and qvevri wines. Tours go into part of the tunnels (where tastings also take place) then up to the viewing tower and restaurant. It’s a 4.5km drive east from Kvareli town centre.

Day 4 :  

in the 3-stars hotel